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Retirement Planners Albuquerque NM

So now that you know what your 401(k) is, you think you're all set for retirement? Think again. We've got a few more lessons to teach you before setting you off on your own. Read on for more information.

Garth Scrivner
StanCorp Investment Advisers, Inc.
(505) 298-1098
6000 Uptown Blvd NE, Suite 470
Albuquerque, NM
Expertises
Advising Medical Professionals, High Net Worth Client Needs, Insurance Related Issues, including Annuities, Middle Income Client Needs, Ongoing Investment Management, Retirement Planning & Distribution Rules
Certifications
NAPFA Registered Financial Advisor, AAMS, BA, CDFA, CFP®, CPA/PFS

Data Provided by:
Donna Skeels Cygan
Sage Future Financial, LLC
(505) 298-4040
4800 Juan Tabo NE, Suite D
Albuquerque, NM
Expertises
Retirement Plan Investment Advice, Ongoing Investment Management, Estate & Generational Planning Issues, College/Education Planning, High Net Worth Client Needs, Helping Clients Identify & Achieve Goals
Certifications
NAPFA Registered Financial Advisor, CFP®, MBA

Data Provided by:
Mr. Brent B. Troy, CFP®
(505) 884-9816
2125 Louisiana Blvd NE
Albuquerque, NM
Firm
Merrill Lynch
Areas of Specialization
Asset Allocation, Employee and Employer Plan Benefits, Retirement Planning, Securities
Key Considerations
Average Net Worth: $250,001 - $500,000

Average Income: $100,001 - $250,000

Profession: Not Applicable

Data Provided by:
Mr. Isaac J Ortiz, CFP®
6301 Indian School Rd NE Ste 609
Albuquerque, NM
Firm
Creative Financial Strategies
Areas of Specialization
Business Succession Planning, Comprehensive Financial Planning, Debt Management, Divorce Issues, Employee and Employer Plan Benefits, Estate Planning, Insurance Planning
Key Considerations
Average Net Worth: $1,000,001 - $5,000,000

Average Income: $250,001 - $500,000

Profession: Medical/Dental Professionals

Data Provided by:
Mr. Steven K. Kinney, CFP®
(505) 881-5400
6501 Americs's Parkway NE
Albuquerque, NM
Firm
Wells Fargo Advisors

Data Provided by:
Stephen Madeyski
Stephen Madeyski Financial Planning
(505) 798-9496
7112 Cindy NE
Albuquerque, NM
Expertises
Retirement Planning & Distribution Rules, Helping Clients Identify & Achieve Goals, Hourly Financial Planning Services, Middle Income Client Needs, Women's Financial Planning Issues, Investment Advice without Ongoing Management
Certifications
NAPFA Registered Financial Advisor, CFP®, MBA

Data Provided by:
Mr. Lee E. Munson, CFP®
(505) 884-3445
2500 Louisiana Blvd NE Ste 508
Albuquerque, NM
Firm
Portfolio, LLC
Areas of Specialization
Investment Management, Life Planning, Sudden Wealth Management, Wealth Management
Key Considerations
Average Net Worth: $1,000,001 - $5,000,000

Average Income: $100,001 - $250,000

Profession: Business Executives

Data Provided by:
Mr. Garth D. Scrivner, CFP®
(505) 298-1098
6000 Uptown Blvd. NE
Albuquerque, NM
Firm
StanCorp Investment Advisers, Inc.
Areas of Specialization
Asset Allocation, Charitable Giving, Comprehensive Financial Planning, Estate Planning, General Financial Planning, Investment Management, Wealth Management
Key Considerations
Average Net Worth: $500,001 - $1,000,000

Average Income: $100,001 - $250,000

Profession: Not Applicable

Data Provided by:
Ms. Marilyn Laux Evans, CFP®
(505) 828-2773
6565 Americas Parkway NE
Albuquerque, NM
Firm
Williams Financial Group

Data Provided by:
Ms. Kathleen M. Winslow, CFP®
(505) 880-1646
2201 San Pedro Dr NE Bldg 25
Albuquerque, NM
Firm
Winslow Wood & Associates LLC
Areas of Specialization
Comprehensive Financial Planning
Key Considerations
Average Net Worth: $1,000,001 - $5,000,000

Average Income: $100,001 - $250,000

Profession: Not Applicable

Data Provided by:
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The Road to Retirement Should Be Paved Today

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The Road to Retirement Should Be Paved Today


So now that you know what your 401(k) is, you think you're all set for retirement? Think again. We've got a few more lessons to teach you before setting you off on your own.
By Joel Mendez | Photos by Jeffrey Buras

Let's begin with the bare bones, unvarnished, not for the squeamish truth. You have available to you the same information that professional investors and analysts use to make their decisions. That is a dismaying fact for many, for others a source of empowerment. You can say to yourself "If the pro's don't know anything more than me, what chance do I have of making some money for my retirement?," or, you can say "if these jerks (no offense guys) don't know anything secret, then what the hell is stopping me?"

First off, I'm not a pro, but I also haven't lost my kid's college fund yet, and actually have managed to finance a small vacation for myself now and again. Most professionals are as surprised as you by what happens to and in the market on any given day. That's why it's news when it drops. Not a single one can tell you with 100% accuracy if the S&P 500 Average will be up or down tomorrow: How many people predicted Enron ? Or Stratton Oakmont ? You need to realize that for analysts and financial planners, it really doesn’t matter, because whether or not you make any money on your investments, they get paid. Your adviser makes money either by charging for his or her advice—no matter how good or bad that advice might actually be—or by commission on your transactions. People who work at mutual funds don't care either. Whether your assets shrink or grow, they get paid because their firms take fees, usually based on a percentage of the total assets managed. For them, it's a zero sum game, that's why mutual funds want to increase their share of invested assets--the more assets they have, the more money they make.

The Hands Off Mutual Fund

Mutual funds have been around since the beginning of the last century (around the 1920's). These things have basically become the investment default for most Americans, usually because we can't be bothered with the minutiae of business and finance. However, if you belong to the new leisure class or, if like me, you're over educated and under stimulated, or you just hate other people doing things for you that you could better do yourself, I suggest that you begin by getting your furry little paws on Keys to Investing in Mutual Funds from the Barron’s Business Keys series. It's easy reading, and you'll learn a lot. An alternative book to get would be Peter Lynch's classic Learn to Earn . Some others (yeah, I read a lot of this stuff) are Trend Following by Michael W. Covel, Getting Started in Swing Trading by Michael C. Thomsett, and if you're really ambitious, The Wall Street MBA by Reuben Advani. Until you’ve read at least one of these (and preferably two or all of them), you should leave your IRA money (or any money you've investe...

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