104,850

Electronics Stores Pawtucket RI

You've finally convinced your checking account it's OK to buy an HDTV. Congratulations, the hard part is over. Now learn the answer to your final question: "What should I buy?" Read on for more information.

Best Buy
(508) 336-1391
41 Commerce Way
Seekonk, MA
Hours
Mon: 10-9
Tue: 10-9
Wed: 10-9
Thurs: 10-9
Fri: 10-9
Sat: 10-9
Sun: 11-7;

Target
(401) 642-0080
620 George Washington Hwy
Lincoln, RI
Store Hours
M-Fr: 8:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m.Sa: 8:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m.Su: 8:00 a.m.-9:00 p.m.

Target
(401) 232-1699
371 Putnam Pike Ste A-250
Smithfield, RI
Store Hours
M-Fr: 8:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m.Sa: 8:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m.Su: 8:00 a.m.-9:00 p.m.

Target
(508) 699-9118
1205 S Washington St
North Attleboro, MA
Store Hours
M-Fr: 8:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m.Sa: 8:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m.Su: 8:00 a.m.-9:00 p.m.

Target
(401) 244-1972
400 Bald Hill Rd
Warwick, RI
 
Target
(508) 336-1117
79 Commerce Way
Seekonk, MA
Store Hours
M-Fr: 8:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m.Sa: 8:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m.Su: 8:00 a.m.-9:00 p.m.

Sony Style
(401) 369-7300
44 Providence Place
Providence, RI
Hours
Mon-Sat 10AM-9PM
Sun 12PM-6PM

Best Buy
(508) 699-5800
1337 S Washington St
North Attleboro, MA
Hours
Mon: 10-9
Tue: 10-9
Wed: 10-9
Thurs: 10-9
Fri: 10-9
Sat: 10-9
Sun: 11-7;

Target
(508) 643-5008
91 Taunton St
Plainville, MA
Store Hours
M-Fr: 8:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m.Sa: 8:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m.Su: 8:00 a.m.-9:00 p.m.

Best Buy
(401) 826-7007
24 Universal Blvd
Warwick, RI
Hours
Mon: 10-9
Tue: 10-9
Wed: 10-9
Thurs: 10-9
Fri: 10-9
Sat: 10-9
Sun: 11-7;

HDTV: A Practical Buyer's Guide

Provided By: 

HDTV header

You've finally convinced your checking account it's OK to buy an HDTV. Congratulations, the hard part is over. Now learn the answer to your final question: "What should I buy?"

By Jeff Barnett

You're ready to buy a new HDTV. You know how to use Google, so you're drowning in data but thirsting for information. You've read eight LCD vs. Plasma articles, talked to five big box electronic store employees ranging from knowledgeable to clueless to weird, and you still haven't found the answer to your most basic question: What features should I care about when purchasing this TV. By arming you with just a little bit of tech knowledge to explain "why," I'll help you make the decision on "what" to buy much easier than you might think.

First, let's get some of the techno-babble and common questions out of the way.

LCD or Plasma?

It doesn't really matter. Gasp! That's right. Despite the innumerable articles written each year on this topic alone, it simply isn't extremely relevant in 2008. When HDTV technology was in its infancy, LCD panels couldn't be produced as large as plasma displays. LCD TVs also suffered from high response times that contributed to blurriness for fast-moving objects. While plasma displays will always be able to produce a blacker black than their LCD counterparts, LCD displays have narrowed the gap in size and picture quality for all but the most discriminating videophile. They also lack the glass covering of plasma displays and will exhibit less glare in a light-rich environment. Practically speaking, just buy whichever technology within your budget looks best to you, because that's what is ultimately important.

What is 1080p and why should I care?

While I think the technical details of high definition video is an enthralling subject, I understand that not everyone shares my enthusiasm. Therefore, I offer the following quick and dirty synopsis. There are three formats for high-definition television: 720p, 1080i, and 1080p. Because of the way display technologies have evolved, we don't talk much about 1080i, so just ignore it for now.

The number (720 / 1080) refers to lines of resolution. More resolution is better, therefore 1080p is better. Look at the picture below. The image to the right has more lines of resolution.

HDTV resolution

Not every TV can display 1080p and not all content is offered in 1080p. You must have both parts of the equation to get a 1080p image. As a matter of fact, the only widespread 1080p content offered anywhere right now is through Blu-ray movies and gaming consoles. If watching movies or high-definition gaming isn't a hobby of yours then you can immediately deduce that you do not need a 1080p HDTV. Furthermore, network and cable HDTV is not offered in 1080p, and because of bandwidth considerations it will not be offered in 1080p for the foreseeable future. Lastly, there is simply a limit to what the human eye can see, and the difference between 1080p and 720p isn't pronounced at smaller screen ...

Click here to read the rest of this article from Primer Magazine

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